Winter Blues

sarah

Winter Blues

Marolyn Love Krasner

Opening: August 17 5:30 pm

Viewing: August 17 until August 27


Nature is chaotic and cyanotype captures this chaos well. Each of these wall hangings are uncontrolled, unpredictable and the product of a collaboration between cyanotype chemicals and the weather. I was there, too.

When cyanotype chemicals are left to expose for more than 15 minutes, the results are unpredictable. Some of these pieces were left outside for up to 48 hours. During the time these pieces were outside, the UV light pierced through the ferns, flax flowers, weeds, and broken branches and created unique abstract images that may or may not resemble the plants I used. They experienced sunshine, high clouds, low clouds, they were rained on, the fabric wrinkled, the wind shifted the compositions, they dried out and got wet again. They are overexposed.

Early on in the process of creating these wall hangings, I tossed out the idea of perfection and decided to work with the damp, dark reality of a Palmerston North winter. The constraints the weather put on my timeline and the consistently low UV light levels offered me the challenge to create images I enjoy despite being made in conditions less than ideal for a traditional sun printing process. I adapted and I have a set of work that I am happy to share with you.

Thank you to Sarah at Space for the opportunity to share these pieces. Thank you to my wife Ruth for your support, Amy Super my mother, Helen for the dress and Carolyn for sewing the wall hangings.

And thank you to you for having a look and supporting local art.

{ Gallery 2 }

About Cyanotype:

Cyanotype is a sun-printing process and one of the earliest photographic techniques, developed in 1842 and mostly creates blue monochromatic prints. Cyanotype is a popular form of alternative photography and is highly accessible and used by all types of artists because of its versatility. Cyanotype is also the origin of architectural blueprints.

Cyanotype chemicals are nontoxic to use in an art practice. Cyanotype chemicals are: Potassium Ferricyanide — A red iron salt and Ferric Ammonium Citrate — A light-sensitive iron salt.


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